Harnessing aptamers for rapid detection of bacteria and antibiotics in our food.

Bacterial Genetics and Genomics book Discussion Topic: Chapter 4, question 14 The specificity of antibody binding has been exploited for many years in a variety of technologies. Although perhaps less famous, aptamers also have high binding specificity for their targets and, being made of RNA or DNA rather than protein, are much smaller in size,Continue reading “Harnessing aptamers for rapid detection of bacteria and antibiotics in our food.”

Merging two concepts: finding genes that are both essential and core

Bacterial Genetics and Genomics book Discussion Topic: Chapter 3, question 13 One of the concepts that is discussed in Bacterial Genetics and Genomics is the difference between essential genes and accessory genes. The essential genes are those that are required for the bacteria to live and the accessory genes allow it to do something elseContinue reading “Merging two concepts: finding genes that are both essential and core”

What can we learn from bacterial genome sequences that are never ‘finished’ and are left in pieces?

Bacterial Genetics and Genomics book Discussion Topic: Chapter 17, question 14 When we first started sequencing bacterial genomes, back in the 1990s, the goal was to ‘finish’, to generate a complete, closed, circularized chromosomal sequence that as accurately as possible reflected what would be seen in the bacterial cell. This process often took months, ifContinue reading “What can we learn from bacterial genome sequences that are never ‘finished’ and are left in pieces?”

Contributions of women to bacteriology: Blog for International Women’s Day 2021

Bacterial Genetics and Genomics book Discussion Topic: Chapter 21, question 16 For these blogs I have not been including the wording of the end of chapter questions from Bacterial Genetics and Genomics. Instead, I have blogged about the general theme of these question, often highlighting a research article on the topic. However, today (8th MarchContinue reading “Contributions of women to bacteriology: Blog for International Women’s Day 2021”

Bacteria breaking the rules – again. This time, its coupled transcription – translation.

Bacterial Genetics and Genomics book Discussion Topic: Chapter 2, question 14 It has long been a defining difference that bacterial cells, like E. coli, have coupled transcription-translation and eukaryotic cells, like animals and plants, make their mRNA in the nucleus and their proteins in the cytoplasm. This is mostly the case. Mammals did break theContinue reading “Bacteria breaking the rules – again. This time, its coupled transcription – translation.”

Studying fascinating microbiomes, working in cooperation with communities, and illuminating study design.

Bacterial Genetics and Genomics book Discussion Topic: Chapter 1, question 14 I recently attended and was an invited speaker, on-line, at a conference that had a topic about short-and long-read sequencing technologies. The various talks and the panel discussion that I participated in looked at the advantages of both short-read sequencing and long-read sequencing forContinue reading “Studying fascinating microbiomes, working in cooperation with communities, and illuminating study design.”

Biology Week Topic: Genomics, Earthquakes, and Cholera

Bacterial Genetics and Genomics book Discussion Topic: Chapter 11, question 14 Although I had planned to continue to work through the Discussion Topics from Bacterial Genetics and Genomics that are all related to the investigations in bacterial genetics and genomics using bioinformatics tools can be conducted outside of the lab, October here in the UKContinue reading “Biology Week Topic: Genomics, Earthquakes, and Cholera”

Bacterial genomes, then and now

Bacterial Genetics and Genomics book Discussion Topic: Chapter 17, question 13 The publications of the first bacterial genome sequences were 25 years ago. The technology has come a long way since then, both in the lab and computationally. One of the first bacterial genome sequencing projects started was one undertaken to sequence the complete EscherichiaContinue reading “Bacterial genomes, then and now”

Research and planning outside of the lab: working with restriction enzymes.

Bacterial Genetics and Genomics book Discussion Topic: Chapter 16, question 15 For this blog, I have decided to look at the Discussion Topic from Bacterial Genetics and Genomics, Chapter 16, question 15, which discusses restriction enzymes and encourages us to try finding digest sites for these enzymes ourselves in a gene of interest, using on-lineContinue reading “Research and planning outside of the lab: working with restriction enzymes.”

More research outside of the lab, protein structure predictions

Bacterial Genetics and Genomics book Discussion Topic: Chapter 16, question 14 Continuing on from the blog post last month, I am keeping on the topic of research that can be done at home, or at the computer, without needing to do experiments in the lab. Quite a lot of genetics and genomics research today involvesContinue reading “More research outside of the lab, protein structure predictions”

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